Christine Koh

Hello!

I'm Christine Koh, a music and brain neuroscientist turned multimedia creative. I'm the founder + editor of Boston Mamas, co-author of Minimalist Parenting, co-host of the Edit Your Life podcast, and creative director at Women Online. Drop me a line; I'd love to chat about how we can work together!

How to Pursue Hobbies with Kids

father-son-fishing.jpgToday, Jane (also of see jane blog) shares inspiration for how to pursue hobbies with kids:

As a stay-at-home mom, I have always prioritized not getting lost in motherhood. Meaning: I remain fiercely loyal to my own hobbies while supporting and encouraging my kids to identify their own interests and talents. Yet, somehow, it never occurred to me until this year to mix the two together. Yes, it's great to enjoy hobbies in solitary, or cheer your kids on as they pursue their activities, but there's something amazing about taking a journey together. When you discover an activity that you can both enjoy, everyone wins.
When my 14-year-old daughter Kiana asked me to take her to hot yoga, we instantly began to share a passion and became connected at a new level. It's amazing to have Kiana by my side, indulging in her own passion for warrior two, tree pose, dancer's pose, and crow pose with sweat dripping from her brow. Not only are we enjoying a hobby together, but I hope that moving forward in life she'll carry forward the importance of self-care.

So are you interested in getting started? Here are my recommendations on how to pursue hobbies with kids:

1. Make lists. Sit down and each make a list of things that you love doing, or things that you've always wanted to try. For example, some ideas might include projects within the following realms: cooking/baking, collecting (e.g., coins, stamps), cars/vehicles, antiques, fitness, arts/crafts, astronomy, camping, music.

2. Compare lists. Compare your lists and identify any overlap; that's a natural place to start. Or maybe you'll each have included items that inspire the other to try something new. Decide on your top mutually agreed upon option (and also maybe a backup in case you run into logistical stumbling blocks, as Christine and her 7-year-old daughter Laurel did when they discovered that Laurel was too young for pottery wheel classes).

3. Pick your first project. And remember to go slow. As you work on identifying your first project, remember that there is an age difference between you and your child; you don't want to start out too fast or at something too difficult and find one or both of you immediately frustrated. For example, if you want to try sewing together, start with a small, simple project, like placemats, instead of a big project like a quilt.

4. Collect your supplies. Depending on what you decide to pursue, you may have what you need at home (e.g., cooking project) or you may need to sign up for something or get some books out of the library or supplies from a craft store. Looking for resources at the library or project items at a store can be a fun experience in and of itself.

5. Remember that it's about the process not the product. As you explore hobbies with your kids, remember that the point is not the finished product so much as the fact that it's special and time together connect.

Have you tried hobbies with your kids? What have you enjoyed together? What would you like to try?


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