Christine Koh

Hello!

I'm Christine Koh, a music and brain neuroscientist turned multimedia creative. I'm the founder + editor of Boston Mamas, co-author of Minimalist Parenting, co-host of the Edit Your Life podcast, and creative director at Women Online. Drop me a line; I'd love to chat about how we can work together!

Medical Accessory Alert

laurens-hope-robot-medical-id.jpgToday, Jennifer shares a couple of great resources for medical alert tracking and cool ID accessories for grownups and kids:

I love jewelry and accessories...I mean, I really, really love them. So when a recent medical issue resulted in my need for a medic ID bracelet (I have an adult onset seizure disorder controlled by meds -- or as I like to say, I'm just a little bit electric), the diagnosis left me with a serious accessory challenge: where do I get a cute medic alert bracelet? And also, how should I store my emergency medical information?
On the latter, I recommend MedicAlert. This user-friendly website and service is actually a non-profit, and a great resource for anyone (adults or kids) with a chronic medical issue, large or small. For a modest membership fee per year ($15 for kids, $30 for adults) MedicAlert will store your key contact information, medications, doctor information, and emergency contacts. Simply sign up online, enter in the data, and if you'd like, you can also order one of their MedicAlert jewelry designs and have it engraved with your personal ID number and the Medic Alert 1-800#. You can go online and update or edit information whenever you need to.

For my medic alert accessory, I ended up splurging on a beaded bracelet from Lauren's Hope. I wanted something fun, silver and gold, yet a little understated to match my watch and wedding ring. Wearing mine is just comforting to me as a mom. If I was ever in a situation where I needed medical help and I was with my kids (ages 5 and 7), all my information would be readily available. And the kids love my "emergency" bracelet! In addition to modern accessory options for women and men, Lauren's Hope also has a lot of fun designs for kids, such as this unisex robot ID pendant (shown).

Wearing my medic alert bracelet has sparked some conversations with friends and fellow moms, a couple of whom have kids with severe food allergies. And actually, having a bracelet or necklace is not a bad idea for a child with allergies, especially for occasions away from home, such as camps or field trips or play dates. Of course, the supervising adults on such occasions are generally aware of allergy issues, but it's yet another safety net in the event of an emergency.


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