Christine Koh

Hello!

I'm Christine Koh, a music and brain neuroscientist turned multimedia creative. I'm the founder + editor of Boston Mamas, co-author of Minimalist Parenting, co-host of the Edit Your Life podcast, and creative director at Women Online. Drop me a line; I'd love to chat about how we can work together!

Hybrid Diapering

gdiapers.bmpToday, Heather reviews the hybrid diapering system gDiapers. Read on for her review, as well as to learn how to win a gDiapers Starter Kit!

“I’m all about convenience, which at times is in direct conflict with my efforts to raise an eco-friendly family. I confess to using disposable diapers on my triplets, and this decision was based solely on convenience. At 19 months we go through about 21 diapers a day (about 7,665 diapers a year) and I continue to struggle with our contribution to the nation’s landfills.
I recently learned about and tried gDiapers, an earth friendly alternative to cloth and disposable diapers. This hybrid diapering system is part cloth and part disposable, flushable, or compostable. The little g pants are the outer washable, cotton cover that comes in a variety of fabulous colors. The Velcro fastens in the back to make it more difficult for tiny hands to undo the diapers. A washable, breathable, waterproof, nylon liner snaps in, and a disposable, plastic-free, chlorine-free, wood pulp insert does the rest.

As for the flushable diaper inserts, to flush, compost, or toss is a personal choice, all of which work with this diapering system. Personally, tossing is our preferred option; it’s easy and convenient. The inserts are plastic-free and will break down, unlike plastic-rich disposable diapers, which will sit in landfills for up to 500 years.

As for the other options, flushing is an excellent method in that it puts poop where it belongs, cuts down on the smelly diaper pail factor, and, once the contents of the flushable arrive at the wastewater treatment plant, valuable nutrients can be recovered and turned into bio-solids, which are then used for fertilizer. Flushing is a process though, and requires some work (see the video instructions available on the gDiapers website); plus, we have low flow tanks, so our toilets don’t easily support this method of disposing. Finally, composting wet inserts (not BM ones) offers beneficial nutrients for garden soil and the refills break down in 50-150 days.

On testing, I found that it was best to have a system in place and recommend having a few diapers put together in advance for those messy situations and moments where speed is essential. Changing wet diapers was easy; simply replace the insert and go. And if you have any questions, the gDiapers website and customer service line (yes, I did call them) are superb!

Bottom line (no pun intended): I found gDiapers easier to use than cloth diapers but a bit more work than disposables. We were thrilled that they passed our ‘leak test’ and the little g pants are so cute that you can let your little one run around in just the diaper! The initial investment and inserts are a bit more expensive than disposable diapers but the cost is justifiable against the eco-friendliness of the system.

If you’re looking for a diapering solution that’s convenient and eco-friendly, I recommend trying gDipaers. They offer a starter kit, which comes with two pairs of little g pants, 10 flushable diaper refills, and a Handy User's Guide (H.U.G.) to help you with the finer points of gDiapering.”

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THIS CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED
Congrats to winner Jamie K.!
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Now, want to win a gDiapers Starter Kit?

  • Visit the gDiapers shop, then email contests@bostonmamas.com (with ‘gDiapers’ in the subject), and name your favorite little g pant style.

  • One entry permitted per person; US entrants welcome to enter.

  • Entry period closes at midnight EST, Monday, September 22, 2008.


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